Do People Decide Whether or Not to Attend Religious Services Based on a Cost-Benefit Analysis?

Posted: April 13, 2011 in Behaviour, Biology, Discipleship

I’ve just come across a very interesting short article on religious service attendance and the human-decision making process.   Written by an economist, the article argues that our brains perform a form of cost-benefit analysis as part of the decision-making process with respect to whether or not we should attend church….or synagogue…or mosque…..etc.  The costs (time lost to other activities) are balanced against the perceived benefits (salvation, fellowship, sense of belonging etc).

Does this make sense?  Personally, I think that it does.  We may not be conscious of it, but every decision we make is the outworking of a form of cost-benefit analysis.  But then, I used to work as an economist, so my view may be slightly jaundiced!  Anyway, here’s a link to the article……so you can make up your own mind:

Do People Decide Whether or Not to Attend Religious Services Based on a Cost-Benefit Analysis?.

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